Scribusoid

Author Topic: find a word and see it on its page  (Read 1776 times)

windhorse

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
find a word and see it on its page
« on: March 31, 2013, 11:20:23 am »
I'm laying out and editing a magazine.
I need to be able to quickly find the name of each author and/or title of her/his piece
and be able to go directly to the relevant page like you would in MS Word or Open Office. The search and replace function in Scribus tells me it has found the word but does not show me the page. Surely there is a simple way to do this?

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1306
  • Karma: 17
Re: find a word and see it on its page
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2013, 01:40:35 pm »
One idea could be to name the frames after the author and title, and use the Outline view to quickly find it.

GarryP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1600
  • Karma: 25
  • Scribus User
Re: find a word and see it on its page
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2013, 04:16:00 pm »
Nermander's idea is a good bit of advice in general. If you name your important frames (not just text but images too) you can find them easily using the Outline view.

I'd also like to add another, slightly off-topic but related, suggestion.

If you want to build a list of authors you could use something similar to a table of contents but have a "table of authors" by giving each piece an "author" attribute rather than a TOC attribute. (It's the same thing, just a different name so you know what it's for.) For more TOC info see here: http://wiki.scribus.net/canvas/Creating_a_Table_of_Contents

The attached SLA shows an example with a table of contributors and another of article titles. (You can combine name and title into the same attribute if that's more useful.)

This might not be right for what you want at the moment but it might be useful to someone else reading this.

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1306
  • Karma: 17
Re: find a word and see it on its page
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2013, 04:30:13 pm »
Such a TOC could for example be used as some kind of temporary list on a page that you remove for the final layout. Like inserting a "page 0" first in the document with a TOC of the authors. You would see the page number and could just jump to that page.

But naming the objects is a really really good habit, especially when you start getting preflight warnings...