Scribusoid

Author Topic: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML  (Read 4762 times)

wyo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« on: December 05, 2012, 05:39:29 pm »
I've tried to import an SVG layouted for the web where pt corresponds to 96 dip. However Scribus use another dip (probably 72 dip). So after the import the SVG was far bigger. How do I set Scribus so it matches my HTML pt?

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
  • Karma: 17
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2012, 12:36:19 pm »
A "point" today is 1/72 of an inch (also called "PostScript point").

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_%28typography%29

From what I understand this is also the case in CSS.

So I'd say Scribus is not doing anything wrong.

wyo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2012, 08:35:05 pm »
It's never a questions what's wrong, it's always a question of usefullness. Well as long as Scribus can't handle the same points as HTML, its IMO useless.

wyo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML -> Solution
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2012, 10:45:44 am »
Just an update, it shouldn't be any problem to support an additional unit "px" which matches HTML-px and is may be configurable in it's size.

utnik

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
  • Karma: 14
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2012, 01:53:50 pm »
hi wyo

there are standard units like:
  • postscript points – the pt scribus uses (1 inch = 72 pt)
  • pica points (1 inch = 72.27 pt)
  • didot points (1 old french foot = 864 pt)
now you introduce the new 'wyo point' wich is essential to make scribus useful…

if this is what you mean, send a feature request! (with a good explanation…)
utnik

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
  • Karma: 17
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2012, 04:48:45 pm »
Wyo, Scribus is intended for print. On print media there is no fixed pixel size.

I can't even find anything saying that HTML uses 96 points or pixels per inch...

wyo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2013, 11:32:36 am »
now you introduce the new 'wyo point' wich is essential to make scribus useful…
How can I introduce a 'pixel point (px)' which can be used as point like in HTML? Is there a way to add new element? How?

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
  • Karma: 17
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2013, 02:57:01 pm »
First off: Give us a reference telling that a point in HTML/CSS is something else than 1/72 of an inch.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/syndata.html#length-units

Also here you can see what applies for SVG

http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/coords.html#Units


So, my conclusion is that you are doing something wrong.

wyo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2013, 03:24:58 pm »
Also here you can see what applies for SVG
http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/coords.html#Units

So, my conclusion is that you are doing something wrong.
Maybe. Yet have a look at the following web page http://www.mobo-fahrschule.ch/test%20scribus.php . Why does this SVG look different when viewed in a browser versus Scribus? Seems that also Scribus does something wrong.

Arran

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 79
  • Karma: 0
  • Typograph
    • Arran Gems
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2013, 03:37:23 pm »
There is really a misconception of pixels and points. Pixels are relative to your own screen and are different form model to model.

You can have a monitor with a width of, lets say, 25" and you have on there 2000 px, but you can have another monitor of same size and this has only 1800 pixels. Or 2200 pixels.

Points are real lenghts, always the same. Unfortunately, the european and the us points are different, in Gutenbergs time or shortly afterwards each font foundry had their own size. So in the 18th century with the industrialisation, continental western Europe decided to use the Didot point of 1 Didot point = 0.37597151 mm. However, don't be fooled, this was not a strictly adhered to width. Many foundaries had slight aberrations: 0.376065 mm (0.0249% larger than Didot's point)—the traditional value in European printers' offices, 0.376 mm (0.0076% larger)—used by Hermann Berthold (1831–1904) and many others 0.37594 mm (0.0084% smaller)—Jan Tschichold (1902–1974), who used 266 points in 100 mm 0.375 mm (0.2584% smaller)—proposed in 1975, but hardly adopted. The different US-points were roughly 0.02 Points smaller.
And then the DTP was introduced: The desktop publishing point (DTP point) is defined as 1⁄72 of the Anglo-Saxon compromise inch of 1959 (25.4 mm) which makes it 0.0138 inch or 0.3527 mm. Twelve points make up a pica, and six picas make an inch.

It  is impossible to have the exact transfer without an exact knowledge of the pixel size on your monitor. Stupidly enough most sales brochures are not delivering this measurements, so you need to find this out yourself. I use ffor this my Gimp, where there is under Preferences, then go to Display and you find a button to make an exact manual calibration. My Pixel is 101.02 x 99.93 of whatever. Then I put these figures under Default Image. My wifes Laptop has a pixel size of 106.516 x 106.573 whatever.

Wikipedia has some very comptehenisive information about the typographical points and the DTPs.
Have you first consulted the Manual? You can probably find the solution there.

Happy Greetings from Scotland's nicest Holiday Island

Nermander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
  • Karma: 17
Re: Pt in Scribus versus pt in HTML
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2013, 07:20:21 pm »
Maybe. Yet have a look at the following web page http://www.mobo-fahrschule.ch/test%20scribus.php . Why does this SVG look different when viewed in a browser versus Scribus? Seems that also Scribus does something wrong.

Do the math using the numbers on the pages I linked and you will see which program is wrong. I doubt it's Scribus.

 

palmate