Author Topic: how to right align a list numbered with Roman numerals  (Read 440 times)

LateJunction

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
how to right align a list numbered with Roman numerals
« on: October 31, 2021, 06:31:27 pm »
When I create a numbered list using Roman Numerals in Scribus 1.5.7, those numbers are left aligned with a ragged right edge. As a result, because these numerals are not fixed width, the first or leading character of the list items are not vertically left aligned: instead they are ragged too.  So, I would like the trailing edge of the Roman numeral to be right aligned as well. How do I do all that - there are no options in the definition of a numbered list which seem relevant.

Biblio

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: how to right align a list numbered with Roman numerals
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2021, 03:14:32 am »
Maybe you could make the list manually and use tab stops (I don't know if you can add tab stops to a list otherwise, but you could experiment). To get the desired result, you could add a right tab stop for the roman numerals and a left tab stop for the items in the list, if I have understood your post correctly.

Ewac

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: how to right align a list numbered with Roman numerals
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2021, 10:42:50 am »
I have a similar problem and I tried to use tab stops. Which works fine if you have one line for each list item. If you have more lines you need to add tabs manually for each line, which can be difficult if you end up making changes to your style later on. Also, it does not work with automated hyphenation, but you would have to manually add your hyphenation and then add the tabs.
Doable but a lot of extra work for something that I would think many people use. The numbered lists have different issues that need to be improved, so maybe this should be suggested as a feature as well.

Biblio

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: how to right align a list numbered with Roman numerals
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2021, 10:18:16 am »
This is already possible in Scribus (if I have understood you correctly), but there is somewhat of a workaround. These instructions assume that you will create a paragraph style for the list instead of using the numbered list option.

I don’t how familiar you are with Scribus, and maybe someday, someone who isn’t that familiar with it will read this, so I will provide step-by-step instructions (which makes them sound complicated if you are already used to using Scribus). I hope that this answers your question.




1. Go to Edit → Styles

2. On the bottom of the Style Manager window, click on “New” and “Paragraph Style”. Choose a name (don’t forget to apply this paragraphe style to the list).

3. Click on the third tab (which is called “Shortcut” in English), and choose the font you want. If you want to change the line spacing, and options like that, click the first tab (“Properties”).

4. Click on the first tab of the window and add a right tabulator by clicking on the ruler that is on the bottom of the window. Then, choose the appropriate/desired options so that the right side of the numbers will be ligned up. Keep in mind that you can change this later and it will apply to all paragraphs that use this style, so you can apply to multiple lists at the same time. This could be necessary, for example, if you end up using a high number (for a list, at least), like XXVIII, but don’t know it at first. To change it, hover over the tabulator until your cursor looks like an arrow pointing in two opposite directions, and make the necessary modifications (otherwise, you will add another tabulator instead of modifying this one). Click somewhere else (but not on the ruler or on another tabulator) or hit return so that the changes take effect. Note that when you are editing the tabulators, you can use math operators, so instead of trying to add 0.123 to 0.689 elsewhere, for example, you can do it directly in the tabulator position’s text field.

5. Add a left tabulator so that the text of the list will be aligned. If you change the first tabulator later, you will need to change this one too. It is easy though, because you can just add the same number to both to make sure that they stay the same distance apart.

6. Add a left indent to the whole text equal to the value of the second tabulator (as that is where the text starts) plus however much you want all but the first line to be indented in. You can do this by increasing the value of the bottommost text field under the ruler. The indentation of the first line will automatically have the negative value of whatever you add so as to balance out. Because we are using tabulators to make the list, you should not change the first line’s indent directly.

7. If you want you, you can add an indent to the right side of the paragraph (there are two text fields directly beneath the ruler and above the one mentioned in the previous step. The one that you need to modify is, logically, on the right). If you want the text of the first line of the list to be centered, but not the numbers, make the right indent be equal to the value of the second tabulator (don’t forget to click on the apply button to see the results. If you have’t added tabs before the numbers and after the colons, it won’t work).

8. If you want to add spacing after each item of the list to better separate them, you can, but if you want your text to be aligned to the baseline grid, you can just hit return instead (the result will look the same), unless you want it to be automatic. To change this value, increase the value in the text field that is next to “↓¶”.

Attached are a picture of the Style Manager window (it is in French, but hopefully, given the above description, it will still help those who are not familiar with Scribus), a picture of the final list in Scribus, and a Scribus file containing said list (I used the Old Standard TT font, which is available for free on Google Fonts. You will need it in order to view the document correctly).



— Biblio