Author Topic: Can I tag text chunks in a large document to create lists on demand?  (Read 115 times)

ScribusHelpMePleabus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
I have a huge text file with entries of text in chronological order. I want be able to make lists on demand from, for example, things that appear on pages 8 and 35, and another lost of things that appear on pages 2, 50, and 100.

Is there a way to apply tags to chunks of texts and be able to compile instant lists of those tags' contents on demand?

Or do you know of another program that can do this?

RobSay

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 33
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
Re: Can I tag text chunks in a large document to create lists on demand?
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2021, 08:09:00 pm »
That's a very open ended question - but fundamentally the answer is yes you can do this in Scribus.

How you do this depends very much on your source material - and requires different techniques in scribus to achieve the effect you want. This will require learning something of how Scribus (and documents in general) work with and format Text.

Source already has the lists ... as paragraph styles
- easiest but least likely .... simply create a frame and 'Get text' from the source file means the style comes across as well. Edit this new paragraph style in scribus to apply whatever effect you want and it will get picked up by every paragraph using this style.

Source already has the lists ... not as styles
- edit the source and make the lists a style .... then see above.

Source does not include the list .. but has some sort of markers or data that can be used for start and end (such as the dates themselves)
- This is *definitely* not a 'beginner task', this is writing a program to modify data - whatever application you use.
- Get Text in scribus frame - then use Scripter to find the text to be formatted and apply a paragraph style
- I would only do automate this if you're doing it multiple times ... and the target date is likely to change.

Whatever you do it always ends up with a Scribus paragraph style that is applied to your list data. I would suggest creating a text frame with 10 separate lines of text in scribus and learn about paragraph styles. Each of the ten lines is a paragraph with 'Style=Default Paragraph Style'. Styles are really important .. and I don't just mean 'styling' by applying a paragraph effect to the selected paragraph.

 

palmate