Scribus > Text and Typography

Exporting to PDF. Embedding vs Outlining fonts

<< < (3/3)

apastuszak:

--- Quote from: Nermander on July 08, 2014, 10:26:39 am ---
--- Quote from: apastuszak on July 08, 2014, 01:15:45 am ---because the "hinting" in the Type I file produced superior printed output at smaller point sizes, unsually output less than 9 point. 

--- End quote ---
That's because at small sizes the resolution also gets smaller. But from what I understand hinting is mostly useful on screen.

3 mm letters on paper don't need hinting, but 3 mm letters on a screen do.

--- End quote ---

In those days, screen fonts were bitmaps linked back to a font file.  There was no on screen hinting until Adobe Type Manager came along.  Before that, all hinting information was used for printing.

apastuszak:
Does using an OTF file give me any advantages over a TTF file?  One of the fonts I am using is League Gothic, from theleagueofmovabletype.com.  I can get the font as an OTF or TTF.  If I used the OTF, I will have to outline the font for the PDF.  If I use the TTF, I can embed.

What's the better choice here?

Engineering_text:
Old topic, but still relevant in 2022. Ten years ago, I always embedded my fonts when exporting to PDF. Today, when trying to embed my fonts, Scribus overrides me and the fonts go straight to "outline". Exotic fonts? Nope. Times New Roman. Arial. I am using Windows 10. So do I have to go somewhere to buy the fonts? This is relevant because the book is in 10 point font with lots of subscripts and superscripts which are 6 to 7 point size. I've noticed my engineering textbooks from 40 years ago, and the engineering books I bought last year all use 10 point font -but theirs looks way better than what I can get with my laser printer.

Back then I was using Linux, so maybe the fonts were open source versions. I guess the fonts in Windows are for personal use only?

Nermander:
If I recall correct OTF cannot be embedded into a PDF, PDF only supports TTF and PostScript Type 3 fonts (or something like that).

Today most operating systems have OTF versions of the fonts instead of TTF version, and that means Scribus needs to convert before embedding.

I think what is called "outlining" in Scribus is rather "converting to a Type 3 font" (potentially also just including the used glyphs, like subsetting).

Oh, I googled, a bit and found that from version 1.6 PDF can also include OTF fonts.
https://www.prepressure.com/pdf/basics/fonts

But it may be that Scribus does not yet support this, maybe it is to difficult to have different font embedding for different PDF versions?

An still, there may also be licensing restrictions in the PDF preventing embedding.

utnik:

--- Quote from: Nermander on May 21, 2022, 09:26:12 am ---…found that from version 1.6 PDF can also include OTF fonts.…

…it may be that Scribus does not yet support this, maybe it is to difficult to have different font embedding for different PDF versions?
--- End quote ---

i made a short test with scribus 1.5.8 and 1.7.0.svn.
if an otf font is marked to be embedded (checked to be used in 'document setup' → 'fonts' but without a check mark on the 'subset' box) scribus allows to embed the font in .pdf 1.6 files – it does differentiate between .pdf versions…

utnik

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

Go to full version