Author Topic: How can I adjust double line spacing in styles ?  (Read 414 times)

fivetech

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
  • Scribus User
How can I adjust double line spacing in styles ?
« on: January 08, 2017, 06:33:56 pm »
I have a text frame on the page. What I would like to do is to adjust double line spacing in edit > styles. There are 4 options. I have chosen "Fixed Linespacing" and set value of it to double of text size. For example if text size == 24pt then line spacing = 48pt. Is it correct and exact double line spacing ?

GarryP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1337
  • Karma: 19
  • Scribus User
Re: How can I adjust double line spacing in styles ?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2017, 02:44:10 pm »
Welcome to the forum fivetech.

The short answer is: Possibly, but probably not.

A slightly longer answer is: It's mostly dependant on the font you're using.

For a better answer, have a look at this: https://medium.com/@mattsamberg/line-spacing-explained-9aecda41f48d (It's mostly about Word but the same sort of guidelines apply.) And there's this too: http://practicaltypography.com/line-spacing.html

Unless you have been told to use double line spacing - for example, it's a requirement of the person/organisation you're producing the document for - then line spacing depends on things like:
* the font (they're all constructed differently);
* the size you're using the font at;
* the page dimensions (up to a point - pardon the pun);
* how the reader will be reading the document (e.g. on-screen/printed);
* who the reader is (any visual difficulties?).
etc. etc.

If you have a choice over line spacing then you will just have to choose what looks best, there's no hard-and-fast rule.
On the other hand, if you already have something that's been produced to the standard you require then try measuring the distance and replicating that distance in your document.

Either way, remember that if you use fixed line spacing and you change the font or the size of the font you will have to change the fixed spacing to compensate.

Sorry there's no easy answer.

 

palmate